Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. Water Lilies (or Nymphéas) is a series of approximately 250 oil paintings by French Impressionist Claude Monet.
Monet’s 1906 painting "Waterlilies No.1" sold for USD $54,000,000 at Sotheby’s in 2014.

About this painting

Water Lilies (or Nymphéas) is a series of approximately 250 oil paintings by French Impressionist Claude Monet. The paintings depict Monet's flower garden at Giverny and were the main focus of Monet's artistic production during the last thirty years of his life.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis.
One of my interpretations (sold).

Detail from Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis. Detail from Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis.
Details from my interpretations of Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis.
In this version I extended the Monet over two canvases - we call this a dyptich.

Student Paintings

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
After 2 glazes, adding impasto with a palette knife.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
Using a brush to add texture and a " painterly look " to thick paint.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
Adding impasto scumbles with a palette knife.
At this point the student has to work through their initial response of " this looks terrible! "... and have some faith in the process.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
A final painting by Jessica. Now, in context and with further work, the scumbled textures look very convincing.
Note that photography struggles to capture what we see with our eye in natural light.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
Cherry's painting. This one has many delicate brush strokes. Once again the photograph can't capture the wonderful subtle shadows created by the thick paint textures.
Nor can it capture the wonderful depth we achieved by adding two separate layers of glaze during this painting.

What will we learn in this painting?

  • Cloth
  • Glazing
  • Impasto
  • Impressionist style
  • Monet brush techniques
  • Pallete knife
  • Scumbling (the art of broken paint)
  • Adding texture to impasto paint by using delicate brushwork
  • Water
  • Water lilies (nymphae)

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