Sketching Vermeer

I want to show you the kind of sketches we create when putting together a portrait painting.

In this case the painting is Vermeer's "Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665".

Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - an initial sketch

Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - an initial sketch
Mapping the negative space.

Notice how unlike drawings they are!

A sketch is a problem solving exercise.

Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - an initial sketch
Guess-timating the angles

Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - an initial sketch
Finding Cezanne's basic shapes: Circle - Triangle and Squares.

Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - an initial sketch
Finding the nested circles, spirals and ellipses.

Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - an initial sketch
Sketch painting using all the information we understood from the charcoal sketches.

These processes are antithetical to the absolute nonsense promulgated about Vermeer by David Hockney and Tim Jenison of 'Tim's Vermeer' infamy.

Hockney and Jenison propose that Vermeer and other Baroque masters relied heavily on optical devices to create their stunningly realistic paintings.

Look what one of my students produced in just 4 hours, using her ability to listen, think and paint.

Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - a student painting at Inglis Academy   Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665 - a student painting at Inglis Academy
Read more: Loretta's Vermeer

Paint Vermeer: 'Girl with the Pearl Earring'.