Monet: Cabin at Sainte-Adresse, 1867

About this session

Explore the beautiful world that lives between green and blue, the world of turquoise!

Monet: Cabin at Sainte-Adresse, 1867

" Monet spent the summer of 1867 with his family at Sainte-Adresse, a seaside resort near Le Havre.

By adopting an elevated viewpoint and painting the terrace, sea, and sky as three distinct bands of high-keyed color, Monet emphasized the flat surface of the canvas.

His approach, daring for its time, reflects his admiration for Japanese prints.
"

Monet: Cabin at Sainte-Adresse, 1867
Delightful blues, greens and turquoise colours are a feature of this Monet.

What will we learn in this painting?

  • Atmospheric Perspective
  • Clouds
  • Impressionist style
  • Landscape Painting
  • Seascape
  • Water

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Accurate colours

In each lesson we use colour charts I have created, showing the main colours in the scene.

Colour analysis of a painting © Peter Inglis 2018 - www.inglisacademy.com
Colour analysis of our Dee Why paintings.
© Peter Inglis 2018

In nature there is potentially an infinite range of subtle colours and tones. Of course we can't mix "infinite"... or we'd take forever!

So what I have done is analyse the most important colours in the scene. Then we can blend using brush stroke techniques and glazes to create as many gradations of colour and tone as we feel the painting needs.

Look at the foam at the bottom left of the scene.

We know foam is white?
Right?
It turns out that particular foam is actually a light blue!

Even in the foam on the main wave there is very little white, we actually find a lot of warm tones reflecting the sunset.

Chevreaux Colour wheel - © Peter Inglis 2018 - www.inglisacademy.com
Remember that each colour is found in one particular place on our Chevreaux Colour Wheel.

Colour Wheel Mastery

About this session

  1. The Chevreul Colour Wheel.
  2. Hue - Tone - Chroma
  3. Greens
  4. The family of Purple (Mauve, Lilac, Magenta, Violet)
  5. Create all the skin tones
  6. Warm and cool greys

The colours derived from Yellow Ochre - image ©2017 Peter Inglis
The Chevreul Colour Wheel was developed in Monet's lifetime and became the main systems of colour for the impressionists.

The colours derived from Yellow Ochre - image ©2017 Peter Inglis
The skins colours are derived from Yellow Ochre.

Purple family. Image ©2018 Peter Inglis.
The family of Purple (Mauve, Lilac, Magenta, Violet)

In each lesson we use colour charts I have created, showing the main colours in the scene.

Colour analysis of a painting © Peter Inglis 2018 - www.inglisacademy.com
Colour analysis of our Dee Why paintings.
© Peter Inglis 2018

In nature there is potentially an infinite range of subtle colours and tones. Of course we can't mix "infinite"... or we'd take forever!

So what I have done is analyse the most important colours in the scene. Then we can blend using brush stroke techniques and glazes to create as many gradations of colour and tone as we feel the painting needs.

Look at the foam at the bottom left of the scene.

We know foam is white?
Right?
It turns out that particular foam is actually a light blue!

Even in the foam on the main wave there is very little white, we actually find a lot of warm tones reflecting the sunset.

Student paintings

Image © 2019 Peter Inglis

Image © 2019 Peter Inglis

Image © 2019 Peter Inglis

Image © 2019 Peter Inglis

Image © 2019 Peter Inglis

Paint this!