A strict process that nurtures individual expression

The variety of results shown in this one session demonstrates that I am teaching a painting process which:

  1. Creates a finished masterwork in one session
  2. and yet allows for a range of personal approaches to the subject.

This is by far the quickest way to find your own style in painting (and music too!). By analysing and interpreting recognised masterworks.

These examples were painted in one session: Cezanne: Apples, 1878.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878
Cezanne's original.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Having found the lines of counterpoint, the student is defining the darkest tones first.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Laying down a base coat of red on that apple gives the canvas a huge lift!

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
This student has worked on all the "positive space" first.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
By way of contrast, this student has mapped all the negative space first!

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Drawing the positive and negative spaces together.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Naomi's Cezanne incorporated a pop culture reference, with a couple of "smiley face" or you might call them "emoticon apples"!

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Gorgeous backgound textures on Naomi's Cezanne, which are difficult to capture with a camera.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Penny's Apples included a Valentine!

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Cherry's Apples showed her preference for Baroque texturing, doubtless informed by her 8 grades of piano and violin repertoire.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Alex managed to capture the "squared-off" shapes that Cezanne preferred. This gives the simple sphere a lot of energy.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Tina's apples displayed soft, blended textures. She later overlaid some constructivist Cezanne strokes with impasto.

Cezanne: Apples, 1878 | Student painting completed in one session at Inglis Academy: www.inglisacademy.com
Detail from Tina's Cezanne.

So at the end of a four hour session we have five unique expressions of artistic style, and five more beautiful paintings have entered the world!