Arranging Monet

One of the most valuable skill sets for musicians and artists is the art of arrangement.

To arrange another person's work effectively you need to understand:

  1. Language
  2. Composition
  3. Style

In this example I took a Monet waterlilies painting which is almost square in dimensions, and stretched it out over three landscape canvases.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.2
Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.2

Monet's Water Lilies 1906, no.2 - a tryptich by Sydney artist Peter Inglis.
A tryptich is three canvases next to each other, creating one very wide scene.

Monet's Water Lilies 1906, no.2 - a tryptich by Sydney artist Peter Inglis.
The first step was to tone the canvas and then sketch in the main features.

Monet's Water Lilies 1906, no.2 - a tryptich by Sydney artist Peter Inglis.
The original piece had to be re-composed in order to translate the sweeping rhythms over this much wider canvas.

Monet's Water Lilies 1906, no.2 - a tryptich by Sydney artist Peter Inglis.
Adding textures.

Monet's Water Lilies 1906, no.2 - a tryptich by Sydney artist Peter Inglis.
A panoramic shot, although distorting the shape, gives some idea of the width of the piece.

Monet's Water Lilies 1906, no.2 - a tryptich by Sydney artist Peter Inglis.
In position! Now it's time to sit back and smell the lilies.

In the field of music, for example I have taken Bach keyboard arrangements of Vivaldi Violin Concertos, and re-arranged them for myself to perform with guitar and strings, or even on solo guitar. Enjoy my arrangement of Vivaldi's 'Autumn' for guitar and strings.